John Sheridan to Retire from The University of Tennessee Medical Center

John Sheridan, vice president of Community and Government Relations at The University of Tennessee Medical Center, will retire at the end of June. He established the first Office of Development at the UT Medical Center while working as a fundraiser for UT. In 2000, John came to work at the medical center exclusively where he worked in private fundraising as well as community and government relations. His role later shifted to include key community activities and place a specific focus on all legislative activities on behalf of the medical center in the state and federal legislature, as well as a liaison to local, state and federal legislators and their staff members.

John SheridanJohn Sheridan, a longtime administrator at The University of Tennessee Medical Center and the University of Tennessee, will retire at the end of June, officials with the medical center announced. Sheridan joined the medical center in 2000 and has been vice president of Community and Government Relations for the past decade. Prior to that, Sheridan spent 25 years at the university in key fundraising positions for academic programs at all five University of Tennessee campuses.

“From the nation’s capital and throughout the state of Tennessee, John Sheridan’s name is synonymous with integrity,” said Joe Landsman, president at CEO of The University of Tennessee Medical Center, “The foundation of John’s career has been built on that integrity and he has represented patients, donors, physicians and other healthcare professionals, students, lawmakers, and all those we serve tremendously well throughout the years. We’ll miss John and wish him well in his retirement.”

Sheridan joined the University of Tennessee at a time when the medical center and university both operated under the same system. In the late 70’s and early 80’s, he spent a few years working exclusively at the medical center to create and establish the first Office of Development at the hospital. Shortly after the medical center became an independent not-for-profit entity, through an act of the state legislature, he joined the hospital staff to work on private fundraising as well as community and government relations. His role later shifted to include key community activities and place a specific focus on all legislative activities on behalf of the medical center in the state and federal legislature, as well as a liaison to local, state and federal legislators and their staff members.

"It has been an honor and a privilege to represent The University of Tennessee Medical Center physicians, nurses, health professionals, and support staff in Nashville and Washington,” said Sheridan. “Our elected representatives recognize the medical expertise and compassionate care our team members provide for the patients and families we serve every day. Advocacy for our issues is eminently easier when quality patient care, sound management, and effective leadership are in place to support your position. I am grateful to Joe Landsman and the senior team at the medical center for the confidence and support they have given me throughout the last nearly 17 years."

Always active in the community, Sheridan has served on numerous boards and professional organizations, including the Ronald McDonald House, Great Smoky Mountain Council of the Boy Scouts of America, U.T. Federal Credit Union, Leadership Knoxville, the Knoxville Chamber Government Relations Committee, Tennessee Public and Teaching Hospital Association (TN PATH), Cancer Support Community, East Tennessee Catholic Charities, Tennessee Hospital Association Government Affairs Council, Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Government Relations Group, Premier Consulting Government Affairs Network, and the Trauma Center Association of America Advocacy Committee.

Sheridan and his wife, Carol, plan to spend more time traveling and visiting their four adult children. Landsman said he expects to announce Sheridan’s successor relatively soon.

The mission of The University of Tennessee Medical Center, the region’s only hospital to achieve status as a Magnet® recognized organization, is to serve through healing, education and discovery. UT Medical Center, a 609-bed, not-for-profit academic medical center, serves as a referral center for Eastern Tennessee, Southeast Kentucky and Western North Carolina. The medical center, the region’s only Level I Trauma Center, is one of the largest employers in Knoxville. For more information about The University of Tennessee Medical Center, visit online at www.utmedicalcenter.org.